Testing of fibre reinforced paving

Topics Covered

Background
Laboratory Test
The bowling ball test
Vehicle over-run
Heavy traffic

Background

Marshalls carried out extensive testing on their recently developed fibre reinforced pimple paving flags, which they designed to withstand the pressures of vehicle over-run in areas designated primarily for pedestrian traffic.  Tests were carried out in their industry recognised testing laboratory which works to both British and European standards and is independently audited by the British Standards Institute to ensure all work is carried out to the recognised processes and procedures.  In addition, their manufacturing premises at St Ives were used to simulate excessive loading over a 6-week trial period.

Laboratory Test

This basic test used laboratory equipment to subject fibre reinforced concrete paving slab to controlled and measurable pressures which exceeded the tensile strength of concrete.   The non-reinforced paving slab cracked immediately whereas the slab with fibre reinforcement demonstrated its capacity to continue to perform as a unit even when failure had occurred.

The bowling ball test

Using two bowling balls of the same weight, the balls were repeatedly dropped directly onto a non-reinforced paving slab and a fibre reinforced paving slab of the same dimensions.  The non-reinforced slab failed totally after the first few attempts, while the fibre reinforced slab continued to perform as a unit even after repeated impact.  This test demonstrated the effect of vehicle over-run, where the weight of the vehicle is passed to the flag through a very small contact area over a very short period of time, as well as the effect of impact loading, such as occurs when heavy objects such as beer kegs or make contact with pavement surfaces.

Vehicle over-run

In this simulation, both non-reinforced and fibre reinforced paving slabs were laid on a poorly constructed sub-base.  To speed up the tests each flag was subjected to an impact load sufficient to exceed its tensile strength, whilst a vehicle was positioned so that its weight was being transferred to the middle of each flag.  Immediately after failure, the non-reinforced paving moved, twisted and separated around the line of failure and a crack quickly opened up which in time would lead to total failure of the slab.  The fibre reinforcement in the other slabs, however, held the surface of the flags together so that they continued to perform as a unit even after fracture.  The strength of the fibres was sufficient to hold the concrete together even when subjected to further loading.

Heavy traffic

On the Marshalls’ manufacturing site at St Ives, Cambridgeshire, a test panel with mixed standard and fibre reinforced paving was installed to replicate a typical pavement in the UK.  The slabs were laid on a well-formed sand base with 2-3mm sand joint.  This type of flexible construction maximises the benefits of fibre reinforcement.  The test area was subjected to over 10 vehicles a day, each weighing up to 48 tons.  Over a 6-week trial period,  the combination of flexible construction methods and fibre reinforced paving showed that it outperformed in these extreme conditions.

Source: Marshalls

             April 2004

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Marshalls. (2013, June 11). Testing of fibre reinforced paving. AZoBuild. Retrieved on August 20, 2019 from https://www.azobuild.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=7478.

  • MLA

    Marshalls. "Testing of fibre reinforced paving". AZoBuild. 20 August 2019. <https://www.azobuild.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=7478>.

  • Chicago

    Marshalls. "Testing of fibre reinforced paving". AZoBuild. https://www.azobuild.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=7478. (accessed August 20, 2019).

  • Harvard

    Marshalls. 2013. Testing of fibre reinforced paving. AZoBuild, viewed 20 August 2019, https://www.azobuild.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=7478.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this article?

Leave your feedback
Submit