Search

Sort by:
Results 171 - 180 of 180 for Fire protection
  • Article - 2 Apr 2003
    Development of Eco-Carat, a building material made from allophane which contains millions of micropores, is described. Technical Brief.
  • Article - 2 Apr 2003
    Fire protection of roofing and steep-pitched clay tiled roofs is discussed, looking in turn at terminology, preventive fire protection in the developed attic storey, and construction details for...
  • Article - 2 Apr 2003
    Invar has the lowest thermal expansion of any known metal or alloy from room temperature up to 230°C. Special low expansion and sealing alloy grades are available. Applications include thermostats,...
  • Article - 31 Mar 2003
    Nullifire S609 is an fire protective coating for structural metalwork. It can be applied offsite reducing on site setup and enabling better quality control. It provides up to 2 hours protection in the...
  • Article - 27 Mar 2003
    Concrete has been around since 5600BC. Developments since then are outlined including the discovery of portland cement. The composition and hydration or 'curing' of portland cements are explained as...
  • Article - 26 Mar 2003
    The careful measurement of the properties of materials and their behavior in fire is required for their effective and safe use.
  • Article - 26 Mar 2003
    Fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) concrete provides an alternative to steel reinforced concrete. It overcomes corrosion problems, possesses high strength and low stiffness and cracks in the matrix are...
  • Article - 26 Mar 2003
    Aluminum is a product with unique properties, making it a natural partner for the building industry.
  • Article - 25 Mar 2003
    The use of plastics and rubbers in building is increasing. Some applications such as pipes and gutters, roofing, cladding panels, anti-vibration mounts, sound insulation, thermal insulation and window...
  • Article - 25 Mar 2003
    Research into the use of composites for construction-related applications is looking at pre-impregnated materials or ‘prepregs’.