UC Irvine Humanities Gateway Building Wins LEED Platinum Certification

Published on December 19, 2011 at 2:54 AM

By Joel Scanlon

Hensel Phelps Construction Company and Fentress Architects have announced that the UC Irvine Humanities Gateway building has achieved the LEED Platinum certification. A distinct entrance to the School of Humanities, the design of Fentress Architects credit the master plan formed by William Pereira while integrating sustainable and innovative features.

Nick Merrick © Hedrich Blessing

The University of California, Irvine urged the architects to design the complex with a multi-disciplinary nature of the humanities education. The complex’s split character was inspirited by Janus. The building, on its one side, has a formal façade that reflects the context of the school with a design matching the existing architecture of the campus. On the opposite courtyard side, the complex symbolizes a free-flowing, organic design planned to arouse a sense of delight. The crystalline wall that rises four stories, exhibits four different widths of glass panels installed in an unplanned manner.

The Gateway building won 57 benchmark points to secure the U.S.G.B.C. LEED Platinum certification. The metal and glass wall system extends the building façade on all the four levels from the floor to the ceiling, reducing the energy consumption need. Furthermore, the three-story light wells infiltrate into the building upward to the sky providing natural light in the building. Outdoor areas designed on the second floor helps students to study and relax.

The complex is incorporated with UCI's central plant to generate heated water and chilled water. The plumbing and mechanical systems in the building surpass Title 24 requirements. The building has occupancy sensors that help control lighting and HVAC. Other sustainable strategies in the building include efficient steam turbines, using machine room-less elevators instead of hydraulic elevators, low E glass and use of 40% local materials to save on shipping costs. The mechanical system in the building combines 100% outdoor air economizers and various flow fans to increase energy efficiency.

Source: http://www.fentressarchitects.com/

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